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Are you looking for ways to integrate ocean observing data and tools into your classroom? This section holds a growing collection of lesson plans and units that can be downloaded, printed and used in an existing curriculum!


This is a short hands-on activity where students arrange and "analyze"/discuss how to read satellite images in small groups of students. Works great as an introductory activity.


This interactive lesson can be used in numerous ways when discussing ocean observing topics. As you will see, this can be used as an introductory tool for used for summarizing such topics discussed as remote sensing, plankton, ocean observing tools, geography of the Gulf of Maine region and more.



The following lessons feature real time and archived ocean data though the use of Google Earth technology.  This collaboration between the Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Program and the UNH Coastal Observing Center produced this mini unit which was presented to teachers at the National Marine Educator Meeting in Portland, ME in 2007.



This three week science unit explains how the carbon cycle can be linked to using ocean observing tools such as buoy technology in the Gulf of Maine. The Carbon Cycle, Phytoplankton and the Ocean unit was co-written and tested by classroom teacher Jonah Rosenfield.



The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) is a web-based collection of case studies (called chapters) that guide users through the exploration of a particular issue in Earth system science. Coastal Ocean Observing Center has developed a chapter for EET entitled "When is Dinner Served? Predicting the Spring Phytoplankton Bloom in the Gulf of Maine."



Take a virtual cruise aboard the Gulf Challenger. Spend the day with research scientists from the University of New Hampshire checking the pulse of the Gulf of Maine.